Six reasons to see Lyric Opera’s ‘The Sound of Music’


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Jenn Gambatese leads a lesson in song in Lyric Opera of Chicago’s “The Sound of Music”

Opera purists have nothing on me. As much as I imagine opera buffs recoil at the mention of R&H being performed on the Lyric stage, I raise an eyebrow when I see such classic American musicals listed alongside Tosca and Tannhäuser. Because, really, The Sound of Music doesn’t require operatic songstylings (aside from that Everest of a first act closer, “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,” which soprano Christine Brewer tackles with gusto), but simple and truthful storytelling. And, from my experience, opera doesn’t quite embrace simple or truthful. It’s all BIG EMOTIONS and GRAND OPULENCE. And the last opera/musical hybrid I saw at the Lyric was an odd amalgamation of naturalistic (and amplified) musical theatre actors paired alongside “park and bark” operatic singers overly enunciating phrases such as “can’t help loving dat man of mine.” Disorientating.

But Lyric’s latest effort proved a delightful surprise. Here are seven reasons why you should check it out:

1) Jenn Gambatese is everything you want in a Maria, the singing nun with a penchant for roaming the hills rather than kneeling in the Abby. She’s goofy, she’s relatable, she gets along well with children — and can even effortlessly hit a high C while picking up a small child. She also manages to convincingly fall in love with Billy Zane’s Captain von Trapp, despite him giving the impression he’d rather be home dusting his Blockbuster Movie Award.


Watch at the 1:30 mark as Gambatese hoists a mini von Trapp (Nicole Scimeca) on her hip while flipping to the key of Julie Andrews.

2) The kids are the most adorable thing ever. Especially the littlest one. Claudia? Hazel? Ruby? I don’t know – I was too enraptured by their ability to be cute and sing in flawless harmony while riding bikes across the Lyric’s cavernous stage (which was also a little scary – the last thing we needed was a von Trapp careening into the Lyric’s orchestra pit).

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Can you handle this Austrian adorableness?

3) Scenic eye-candy! It’s like we’re actually amongst the Austrian hills, without the wildlife or climbing. Set designer Michael Yeargan has fashioned some eye-popping scenery that really highlights how overwhelmed the modest Maria must feel in the Captain’s grand homestead. Not since Norma Desmond’s floating living room in ALW’s Sunset Boulevard have I seen such a swanky onstage pad.

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Maria gets freaky with the Captain, while Elsa throws shade from above. Also: scenery!

4) The orchestra. With 37 players in the pit led by Broadway veteran Rob Fisher, Rodgers & Hammerstein has never sounded better. Fisher could have upped the tempos a bit (especially in “The Lonely Goatherd”), but the score certainly sparkles.

5) Chicago cred. Looking over the list of bios, I was pleasantly surprised by the number of well-respected Chicago actors, including Susan Moniz and Cory Goodrich as two of the nuns who sing of solving a problem like Maria. (In fact, Ms. Goodrich understudies Maria — I’d love to see her take on the role). Frau Schmidt, Captain von Trapp’s trusty housekeeper, is given a burst of warmth and charm by my personal favorite Chicago leading lady, Mary Ernster. And Porchlight Music Theatre Artistic Director Michael Weber plays a host of roles.

6) The nuns. Aside from the full orchestra and the grand sets, I wasn’t sure what the world of opera really brought to this piece. Most of the key parts and scenes are played by amazing musical theatre actors, so it was like a musical in a Broadway house with some sweet upgrades. However, during the wedding scene, an army of nuns stepped forward and raised the roof with their choral stylings, and I got the opera chills.

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The nuns blast the joint with their vocal pyrotechnics, thus disorientating the Nazis and allowing the von Trapps to literally climb every mountain.

“The Sound of Music” plays through May 25 at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. More info here >

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